in Marketing & Media

Psychographics Of The Twitterati

We might be on the verge of Tweetering out on why-Twitter-matters analysis — yes, I know I’m guilty. Nonetheless, my former colleague, branding guru extraordinaire, Pete Blackshaw has a nice piece on Twitter psychographics. He offers the following Machiavelli-inspired segments:

  • TweetBacks. These are folks who use Twitter as a real-time focus group for immediate feedback
  • TimeTweeters. These folks just love to “punch the clock” with a time-stamped discovery before anyone else.
  • FlackSmackers. These are journalists or high-reach bloggers who use Twitter to publicly complain — nay, groan — about lame PR or shill-induced pitches.
  • SpamSneakers. These are the folks who use Twitter as just another marketing channel for preexisting content.
  • BrandBaggers. These folks “bag” anything related to their brands and use tools like Twitter as a customer-service or resolution proxy.
  • BankRunners. These are the folks who post “end is near unless you act now” messages, potentially eliciting a sense of panic — a run on the bank, if you will — among Twitterites.
  • RingCiters. These are the folks with real or virtual ring-side seats at sporting events who can’t resist sharing even most mundane play-by-play, as though the rest of Twitter Nation is glued to their modern day Howard Cossel-inspired tweets.
  • Tweetniks. People who try to write literature with Twitter. Every once and a while you’ll find someone turning Twitter into haiku.
  • FamilyTweeters. These are folks (like myself) who tweet about the most mundane of family-related issues.
  • ProudRouters. Quintessential connectors, these folks love to forward things from other Twitter posts.
  • TravelTeasers. These are the folks who create a bit of mystery about exactly where they are.
  • WeightWatchmen. These folks believe Twitter’s potential for peer pressure might have motivational value for losing weight or achieving some other major goal.
  • TweetSquaters. These are folks (sinister or entrepreneurial, depending on your view) who squat on well-known Twitter names.
  • AdverTweeters. Lots of brands are tweeting these day, observes Machiavelli.
  • Twitterazi. Even worse than paparazzi, Machiavelli warned.
  • GameTrappers. These folks post Twitter messages to an entire distribution list hoping to snare an unsuspecting target to respond (usually in error) to the entire group.

See Pete’s ClickZ column.

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  • http://blog.walmedia.com Chris

    This is funny but only because I own the domain AdverTwitter.com. Big plans, friends, big plans.

  • http://www.attentionmax.com maxkalehoff

    Chris: You gotta let Pete Blackshaw know! @pblackshaw (on twitter)

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  • http://www.fatlester.com/ Fat Lester

    This was a very funny post, and a refreshing break from the standard takes.

    I very recently fell to the peer pressure and joined Twitter. Within a week, dozens of my friends from Mixx had already friended me on Twitter. It seems almost everyone from Mixx is on Twitter. It was too much for me to continue to ignore.

  • http://www.attentionmax.com maxkalehoff

    It seems like lots of people are leaving their social networks for
    Twitter. Nobody stays on any one network for that long!

  • http://www.fatlester.com/ Fat Lester

    This was a very funny post, and a refreshing break from the standard takes.

    I very recently fell to the peer pressure and joined Twitter. Within a week, dozens of my friends from Mixx had already friended me on Twitter. It seems almost everyone from Mixx is on Twitter. It was too much for me to continue to ignore.

  • http://www.attentionmax.com maxkalehoff

    It seems like lots of people are leaving their social networks for
    Twitter. Nobody stays on any one network for that long!

  • http://twitter.com/Psycho2011 graphics

    Hi
    Do you see why demographics and psychographics are so important now?
    You are defining who your customer is and what is important to them
    so that when they walk out of your store or buy something from you they get the product and not the commodity.
    psychographic